Breakfast and a Movie


The Friends of the Hollywood Theater invites you to join us for a light brunch and a classic movie. Breakfast and a movie is $15 ($13 for Hollywood members).  You must order your brunch ticket by 11 p.m., the Thursday BEFORE the movie online or at theater.  Doors open for the brunch at 10:15 a.m., and the film starts at 11. Film only tickets ($8) can be purchased at the door after 10:40 a.m.  Catering by Prohibition Pastries. 

* We encourage attendees to arrive early as the church across from the theater has services at 11. Please remember there is a lot off Glenmore Avenue, just a block and a half from the theater. That lot connects to another lot off West Liberty Avenue.  Please remember the upper lot off Espy Avenue (across from the church) is PUBLIC parking; the lower lot is reserved for the church.

**Please note that while we always have vegetarian options for the breakfasts, the meals contain gluten, dairy, eggs, and sometimes nuts.



The Sting
SUNDAY, APRIL 23 – Get breakfast tickets by Thursday, April 20
Breakfast at 10:30AM, movie starts at 11AM – Tickets here!

Four years after setting box offices ablaze in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Paul Newman, Robert Redford, and director George Roy Hill re-teamed with similar success for The Sting. Redford plays Depression-era confidence trickster Johnny Hooker, whose friend and mentor Luther Coleman (Robert Earl Jones) is murdered by racketeer/gambler Doyle Lonnegan (Robert Shaw). Hoping to avenge Luther’s death, Johnny begins planning a “sting” — an elaborate scam — to destroy Lonnegan. He enlists the aid of “the greatest con artist of them all,” Henry Gondorff (Paul Newman), who pulls himself out of a drunken stupor and rises to the occasion.

Hooker and Gondorff gather together an impressive array of con men, all of whom despise Lonnegan and wish to settle accounts on behalf of Luther. The twists and surprises that follow are too complex to relate in detail — suffice to say that you can’t cheat an honest man, and that you shouldn’t accept everything at face value. The Sting became one of the biggest hits of the early ’70s; grossing 68.5 million dollars during its first run, the film also picked up seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay, and Best Adapted Score for Marvin Hamlisch’s unforgettable setting of Scott Joplin’s ragtime music. Rottentomatoes.com gives it a 93%, saying: “Paul Newman, Robert Redford, and director George Roy Hill prove that charm, humor, and a few slick twists can add up to a great film.”

(comedy-Drama/1973/PG/129 min)

It is a sparkling film, an American Borsalino, with sharp, clever dialogue, directed at a fine pace and with a good eye for period detail by George Roy Hill.  —The Spectator



The Sound of Music
SUNDAY, MAY 14 – Get breakfast tickets by Thursday, May 11
Breakfast at 10:30AM, movie starts at 11AM – Tickets here!

Celebrate Mother’s Day with one of the most popular movie musicals of all time! The Sound of Music is based on the true story of the Trapp Family Singers. We all know the story: In 1930’s Austria, a young woman named Maria (Julie Andrews) is failing miserably in her attempts to become a nun. When the Navy captain Georg Von Trapp writes to the convent asking for a governess that can handle his seven mischievous children, Maria is given the job. The Captain’s wife is dead, and he is often away, and runs the household as strictly as he does the ships he sails on. The children are unhappy and resentful of the governesses that their father keeps hiring, and have managed to run each of them off one by one. When Maria arrives, she is initially met with the same hostility, but her kindness, understanding, and sense of fun soon draws them to her and brings some much-needed joy into all their lives—including the Captain’s and soon he and Maria find themselves falling in love. Filled with beloved Rodgers and Hammerstein’s songs including “Edelweiss,” “My Favorite Things,” and “Climb Ev’ry Mountain,” this movie won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director for Robert Wise.

(Drama-Musical/1964/G/174 min)

This movie has a confidence and a sense of moral purpose that warms the hardest heart.  —The Daily Telegraph (UK)